the dream
rockin' and rollin' on two wheels by pedal power

Where it all began…

Posted: September 27th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: bicycles, general | 1 Comment »

Bikes have had a meaningful part of my life for as long as I can remember.  I will grant that I don’t recall what my first bike was, but I do recall that it was red.  I learned to ride a bike on that unpaved street and rode it up and down and up and down our drive that extended toward to river that was well behind the property.

My next bike as a Raleigh BMX.  This was the Canadian Raleigh so who really knows what the model was.  The bike was very entry level, but there were some neat details.  The frame was a loop-tail and it had an oval top tube.  Yes, very much like a Yeti FRO.  The frame was silver. I rode that bike hard until I got my first 10-speed.

I don’t recall how I came to get it, but around sixth grade I got a Nishiki International, which was in many ways a nice bike.  It was dark metallic blue and had alloy rims, Suntour parts (ARX probably) and lots of other nice details.  I entered my first race on that bike in the seventh grade, racing the bike leg of a triathlon.  Around that time I also got my my first mountain bike.  Also, by about 1985, I was reading bike magazines with a hunger.

Nishiki International just like mine

My first mountain bike came from the Terrace Co-op, and was pretty much a piece of junk.  Very heavy frame, built from some sort of craptastic pig iron.  Parts were all garbage.  Still, I wrenched and rode that thing all over the place.  I carefully drilled and filed parts to reduce weight (somewhat pointlessly) and toiled for ours packing and repacking bearings, lubing cables, and tweaking it to be “just so.” I even painted the bike to make it lumpy and white.

By the ninth grade I had moved to Edmonton.  To realize my dreams of having a mountain bike that was a pile of garbage, I started working as a wrench and salesguy at the now defunct Edmonton Cycle.  At school I also successfully pitched writing a paper on local framebuilder Jim Moulden as my Academic Challenge project.

Edmonton Cycle carried Norco, Nishiki, Fiore, Raleigh and BRC bicycles.  All mid to low range Canadian brands.  Still, the Fiore San Remo was good enough for me, with Araya rims, a Tange frame and Deore running gear.  I rode and tweaked that bike hard. Hanging out at Jim’s frame shop, however, I knew I really wanted something with a sloping top tube that was hand built from Tange Prestige and which was fillet brazed.  My hunger was starting to take shape.

By the end of ninth grade, I picked up my first used Moulden. The bike was radical with a rasta fade, and a 140mm stem.  It was fast and low and tore it up on the fast Edmonton hardpack trails.  I continued to upgrade the bike with Bullseye, IRD and WTB parts and eventually had it repainted blue, purple and teal. I also picked up a Colnago Sport (which is not like the bike below)

When I was in 10th grade, Jim decided to open up a retail shop – The Hardcore Mountainbike Store.  I jumped to the shop and enjoyed working there.  In addition to Mouldens, we sold Konas, Breezers and Bridgestones.

I went through a sequence of Jim’s bikes, as I tried different frame geometries and designs.  The first Moulden that I had built for me was steep with short chainstays and a long top tube. (72/74, 22.5, 16 3/8).

In 1989, after a ferocious letter-writing campaign, Jacquie Phelan and Charlie Cunningham relented and let me come to their place in Marin to soak in the mountain bike history.  I had an idyllic time riding with them and other local luminaries and hanging in Charlie’s shop.  I drove them both nuts too, natch.

After returning, I got some Charlie religion and designed a more relaxed with a shorter top tube and longer stays. (70/71, 22.25, 17).  At that time I was racing a Proctor Townsend 753 frame with a mix of Campagnolo and Dura Ace parts.

After graduating high school I had plans to try to get involved in the bike industry and maybe even to race mountain bikes professionally.  My big plan involved intense training to build on my final successful year as a junior racer.  Things didn’t work out and I hurt my knees riding through Northern California.  After returning from the trip I did months and months of rehab but wasn’t successful.  I also hurt my shoulder and had to have surgery that wiped me out for nearly a year.  After recovering from surgery, I sold my bikes and went to college.

In high school, one of my dreams was to get to Osaka – the heartland of the Japanese cycling industry and home to Tange, Shimano, Araya and others.  It wasn’t until my second to last year of college that I was able to actually get to Osaka – and rekindled my love of bikes.  I started riding again.  I built my Japanese bike up from spare parts that had been discarded at the dorm I was staying.

In Osaka I rode all over the place, but my favorite ride was to Mino.

I came back from Japan, graduated, started working and also re-immersed myself in the bike world. In particular, I started hunting down the bikes that I had developed a love of during the 80s and early 90s.

In the early naughties I started racing again, racing the NYC area H2H series as well as joining park races (circuits in Central Park in Manhattan and Prospect Park in Brooklyn). I also discovered that a nostalgia community in the form of the Vintage Retro Classic sub-forum on MTBR.com. I resurrected my 1980s persona as the bushpig (in the 80s there had in fact been two bushpigs).



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